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::: Island of Hawaii Postmarks, Part 3 - Keaau to Niulii :::

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Keaau 255_01 4Aug99 cover


Cover bearing Keaau 255.9a1 (1RRRR), dated August 4, 1899. Three strikes of this postmark are recorded.


Keaau, Puna District
"hindering current"
1899-1900
Postmaster: Peter Lee (1899-1900)
Camp for the Olaa Plantation, located near the Olaa Sugar Mill near the junction of the Volcano Road and Pahoa Road. See notes for Olaa. Mail service was by the Hilo to Volcano carriage route.


Keaau location

Location of Keaau.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii

801
manuscript
Keaau
Rarity: 1RRRR

Keaau 801

ex-Davey

Keaau 801 -1 retroreveal

ex-Davey
(retroreveal enhanced, www.retroreveal.org)

255.9a1
29mm double lined circle
Color: Purple
Rarity: 1RRRR, three strikes recorded
Usage: June 8, 1899 to January 17, 1900
Added by Burns in 1972.

Keaau 255_01 4Aug99

August 4, 1899

Keaiwa, Ka'u District
"the mystery" [Pukui]; "the brave" [Davey]
1860-1869; 1877-1880
Postmasters: F. Lyman (1860-at least 1875), G. W. Willfong (1877-1878), W. Goodale (1879-1880). Keaiwa was the name of the sheep and goat ranch operated by Fred Lyman (of the Hilo family) near present day Keaiwa Reservoir upland of Pahala. In 1868, the place was destroyed by an earthquake said to be the strongest ever to hit anywhere in the present-day United States outside of Alaska. By the 1870s, it was the site of sugar planters associated with the Hawaiian Agricultural Sugar Mill and Plantation Company, W. Goodale, manager. Wilfong was a planter and deputy sheriff and owned a general store at Keaiwa that may have served as the post office when he was postmaster and also when Goodale was postmaster. Mail service was by the Hilo to Kawaihae overland route via Kona or by ships landing mail at Honuapo or Punaluu.
About 500 2¢ stamps were used annually.


Keaiwa location

Location of Keaiwa.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii


Keaiwa 809 61 - P.M. Keaiwa ms

An 1861 letter presumably sent by Fred Lyman inscribed “PM Keaiwa,” the only recorded example of marking 809.


Hono 243_02 __ - Jun 24 to Keaiwa, cover front c. 1870

A circa 1870 cover front addressed to Lyman at Keaiwa inscribed “Per Kona Packet.” Kona Packet was an interisland schooner on the Ka’u run from Honolulu.


Lahaina 242_13 69 - Feb 17 to Keaiwa

An 1868 cover sent from Kaluaaha, Molokai to Lyman at Keaiwa. This letter was sent first to Lahaina on the Molokai work boat unstamped (no stamps were available at Kaluaaha). The Lahaina postmaster affixed a stamp and forwarded it via Honolulu to Kawaihae. The letter then traveled in the overland mail via Kona to Keaiwa.

801
manuscript
Keaiwa
Rarity: 1RRR
Noted on Scott numbers 31 and 35; at least four different types based on handwriting are identified.

Keaiwa 801(I)

ex-Peters


Keaiwa 801(I) Twigg

(Courtesy of Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleteries)


Keaiwa 801(III) Twigg retroreveal

(retroreveal enhanced)


Keaiwa 801 (I) on 31 Wild

(Courtesy of Norbert Wild)
Lyman’s characteristic flourish on the “K” shows he was still postmaster when this 1864 stamp was canceled.


Keaiwa 801(III) type 2 on 35 Wild

(Courtesy of Norbert Wild)

802
manuscript
Keaiwa/
P. O.

Rarity: 1RRR
Noted on Scott No. 31

Keaiwa 802(II) ms-4

“Lyman’s characteristic K”


Keaiwa 802(II) on 31 cover AUG 3  1868 close-up Wild

(Courtesy of Norbert Wild)


Keaiwa 802(III), ex-Golden

ex-Davey

803
manuscript
Date/
Keaiwa

Keaiwa 803, ex-Golden

ex-Davey

806
manuscript
Keaiwa/
P.O./
Kau

Rarity: 1RRRR
Noted on Scott No. 31

Keaiwa 806 ms

809
manuscript
P.M./
Keaiwa

Rarity: 1RRRR
1861

Keaiwa 809 61 - P.M. Keaiwa ms detail

Docketed 1861; note Lyman’s characteristic flourish on the “K”

Kealakekua, South Kona District
"path of the gods"
1856-1900
Postmasters: P. Cummings (1857-1866), George F. Spencer (1866), sheriff Richard B. Neville (1866-1868), Alex Smith (1868-1870), H. N. Greenwell (1870-1891), Rev. S. N. Davis (1891-1894) and R. Wassman (1894-1900). Four places in the vicinity of Kealakekua Bay were locations for postal facilities: Kealakekua, Kaawaloa, Hudsonville and Napoopoo. Kealakekua and Kaawaloa are land divisions (ahupuaa) as were Onouli and Kalukalu where Hudsonville and later Kealakekua post offices were located (go to http://evols.library.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10524/49272 for an 1901 map, courtesy of the University of Hawaii, Manoa; red dots on the map are post office locations in 1901; ahupuaas are shown with their boundaries). Today, the town of Kealakekua has absorbed Onouli and Kalukalu (but not Kealakekua ahupuaa). Napoopoo is a landing on the south shore of Kealakekua Bay near the edge of Kealakekua ahupuaa. Kaawaloa ahupuaa stretches from Kaawaloa Landing on the north shore of Kealakekua Bay to the uphill region now occupied by the town of Captain Cook. Kealakekua ahupuaa abutted Kaawaloa’s south boundary. The uphill region is on a plain at about 1500’ elevation so travelling between the landings and the uphill region wasn’t a casual thing even on horseback. Contemporary writers rarely specified whether they meant uphill Kaawaloa or the Kaawaloa landing. Kealakekua and Napoopoo often were fused in contemporary writings. In 1890, Rev. J.D. Davis, whose church and residence were near Napoopoo Landing, complained about the name confusion: “H.N. Greenwell is put down as the Post Master for Kealakekua; whereas his store house residence & the Post Office is about two miles from the land of Kealakekua & at least three miles [uphill] from the landing. The P. Office at Napoopoo is near the landing & within a few hundred yards of said land Kealakekua. Letters & Parcels sent to Kealakekua P.O. often lie there for weeks, causing great discontent & confusion. Why not call things by their right names? Either Kalukalu, the name of the land, or Central Kona, as it is near the boundary of North & South Kona? If any P. Office is called Kealakekua, it should be the one on the Sea Shore, Kealakekua Bay.” Perhaps any inaccuracy in the following rendition of what office was where and when can be forgiven.

The original post office was at Capt. Cummings’s store at Napoopoo Landing and it was called Kealakekua P.O. Uphill, T.H. Paris had a post office at Hudsonville in Onouli ahupuaa (1857-1863). Henry Greenwell opened a post office (1866) uphill in Kaawaloa ahupuaa near what is now the town of Captain Cook. In 1868, Greenwell’s Kaawaloa post office was closed and the post office equipment was moved down to the Kealakekua post office at Napoopoo Landing. In 1869, Smith ran the post office in a room at the landing rented for a combination collectors office and post office but moved the post office to his nearby residence. In 1870 Greenwell opened a new store in Kalukalu ahupuaa on the border of Onouli ahupuaa where the Hudsonville post office had been located. These sites are just south of today’s town of Kealakekua. The Kealakekua post office moved from Napoopoo to Greenwell’s new Kalukalu store in 1870 and was run from the store. Postmaster Davis moved the post office to his home near Greenwell’s store. Wassman apparently moved it a couple of miles north to “Mrs. Yates’s,” despite complaints. The postmarks of Kealakekua are all associated with the office while it was located uphill. Mail service was by the overland route from Kawaihae to Hilo via Kona. A manuscript “ECC” is known on a Scott No. 31 cover originating in the neighborhood of the coastal location.


Kealakekua location

Location of Kealakekua post office.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii

282.016
33mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle; 10 ray sunburst
Colors: Purple, Black
Scarcity: 3
Usage: February 9, 1883 to June 28, 1891
Note the semi-colon following "Kealakekua."

Kealakekua 282_016 83 - Feb 9 - EKU – Kay

February 9, 1883, black
(Courtesy of Phil Kay)

Kealakekua 282_016 83 - Sep 14

September 14, 1883, purple

282.011
33mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple
Estimated: 7
Usage: April __, 1891 to August 27, 1897

Kealakekua 282_011 96 - Apr 3

April 3, 1896

Kealakekua 282_011 96 - Apr 3 retroreveal

April 3, 1896
(retroreveal enhanced)

281.02
30mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple
Estimated: 7
Usage: July 30, 1895 to June 7, 1900
In 1895, Wasserman complained that some date type was missing and type kept falling out. He asked for a new office stamp in 1896 because the one he had was “pretty well worn out.” Apparently he never received a new one.

Kealakekua 281_02 98 - Nov 7

November 7, 1898

Kealakekua 281_01 from time sheet

May 4, 1900

Keauhou, Puna District
Keauhou, South Kona District

"the new era" [Pukui]; "the new regime" [Davey]
1866-1868; 1881-1900
During the first postal period, the office known as Keauhou was located at a landing in Puna used for the Volcano House. During the second period, the office known as Keauhou was located in South Kona at the village by that name and the birthplace of Kamehameha III.
Postmasters: 1) at Puna: George Jones (1866-1869); 2) at South Kona: J. G. Hoapili (1881-1892), Mrs. G. W. Pilipo (1892-1894) and J. N. Koomoa (1894-1900). While the office was located at the Puna landing, it serviced the Volcano House and was run by the manager of Volcano House at the time. The landing was destroyed in 1868 by a tidal wave. The office at Puna used about 250 2¢ stamps annually. The office at South Kona, located near the steamship landing, sent about 3,000 to 4,000 letters annually from 1887 to 1894, but had stamp sales of only about $45 in 1899. Mail service was by the overland carrier between Kawaihae and Ka’u via Kona.


Locations of Keauhou

Locations of Keauhou, first in Ka'u and later in S. Kona.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii

802
manuscript
Keauhou P. O.
Rarity: 1RRRR
Noted on Scott No. 31

no image available

282.013
32mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle; the circle became broken below the "K" before 1890
Color: Purple, Blue, Red
Estimated: 6
Usage: March 8, 1883 to May 4, 1900
Blue is noted January 31, 1889; purple from May 30, 1891 to March 3, 1899

Keauhou 282_013 83 - Mar 8 Rumsey detail

March 8, 1883, blue
(Courtesy of Rumsey Auctions)


Keauhou 98 - Apr 9

April 9, 1898, purple


Keauhou 282_016 00 - May 4

May 4, 1900, red

Kohala, North Kohala District
a name for the Pandanus tree
1858-1900
Postmasters: Rev. E. Bond (1855-1877), Dr. J. Wight (1878-1883), A. Wight (acting, March, 1879 to July, 1879), H. P. Wood (1883-1885), J. Haig Mackenzie (1886-1887), Ed G. Hitchcock (1887), W. L. Eaton (1887-1891), Miss E. D. Low (1891-1898) and Miss Maude R. Woods (1900). Located at Iole, about a quarter of a mile east of Kapaau, during Rev. Bond’s tenure; moved east about a mile to Halawa where Wight and Wood had a merchandise store; established at Kapaau when Hitchcock was postmaster. The office was moved into the court house building (still standing) in Kapaau in 1889. Kohala mail service was by overland carrier across the Kohala mountains to Waimea where the mail was collected by the Hilo to Kawaihae carrier and taken to Kawaihae. When the Hawaiian Railroad was built from Mahukona to plantations in North Kohala in 1882, mail service was by train to the landing at Mahukona. The Kohala office was furnished 2¢ Numerals in July, 1859. Between 1865 and 1871, the Kohala office used about 3000 2¢ stamps annually and reached a peak of letters sent at about 14,000 in 1887. Volume declined to 12,000 in 1890, 9,000 in 1892 and 8,000 in 1894. Stamp sales in 1899 amounted to about $1,600.


Bond_House,_19th_century

Bond residence at Iole, site of the first Kohala post office.


Kohala Railway Trestle, c. 1890

Kohala Railway Trestle, c. 1890


Location of Kohala

Location of Kohala post office.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii

802
manuscript, some with date
Kohala/
P. O.

Rarity: 1RRRR
Noted on Scott No. 31

Kohala 802 detail

December 18, 1869

803
manuscript, some with date
Kohala/
P. O./
date

Rarity: 1RRRR
Noted on Scott No. 31

Kohala 803 70 - Feb 10 Siegel

February 10, 1870
(Courtesy of Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries)

238.02
30mm single outer circle
Color: Black
Scarcity: 2
Usage: August 18, 1878 to May __, 1883

Kohala 238_02 80 - Jul 17 detail

July 17, 1880

282.013 (I)
33mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle; in type I, Kohala letters are 3.5mm high and 5mm wide
Color: Purple
Scarcity: 3
Usage: June 1, 1883 to June __, 1888
Colors range to a very dark, blackish purple

Kohala 282_013 I _ Aug 11

August 11, 18__


Kohala 282_013 I _ Aug 11 retroreveal

(retroreveal enhanced)

Kohala 282_013 I 86 - Apr 10

April 10, 1886

281.013
30mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Date slugs usually are thick, but strikes with thin dates are noted.
Color: Purple, Black, Blue
Estimated: 6
Usage: August 11, 1886 to December 23, 1891
I note a purple strike on February 25, 1887, black from January to March, 1888, purple again in September, 1888, blue in September and October, 1889. All other strikes in my collection are purple.

Kohala 281_013 88 - Mar 24

March 24, 1888, black


Kohala 281_013 89 - Sep 4 OFF

September 4, 1889, blue


Kohala 281_013 90 - Apr 3

April 3, 1890, purple

282.011
33mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Blue
Estimated: 8
Usage: January __, 1892 to May __, 1900
The date is often oriented oddly.
By February 4, 1895, the last clear dated example I have, the device had become broken. Query: is the reported May, 1900 last date of use accurate?

Kohala 282_011 93 - Jan 13

January 13, 1893


Kohala 282_011 93 - Jan 13  retroreveal

January 13, 1893
(retroreveal enhanced)


Kohala 282_011 95 - Feb 4

February 4, 1895


Kohala 282_011 95 - Feb 4 retroreveal

February 4, 1895
(retroreveal enhanced)

282.013 (II)
33mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle; in type II, Kohala letters are 2.5mm high and 3mm wide
Color: Purple
Estimated: 8
Usage: March 7, 1895 to October 9, 1900; a January, 1884 strike is reported, but I suspect it is in error.

Kohala 282_013 II 96 - Feb 27

February 27, 1896


Kohala 282_013 II 96 - Feb 27 retroreveal

February 27, 1896
(retroreveal enhanced)


Kohala 282_013 II 96 - Aug 22

August 22, 1896


Kohala 282_013 II 96 - Aug 22 retroreveal

August 22, 1896
(retroreveal enhanced)

254.9a18
28mm double lined circle; many strikes fail to print the dots and later strikes are single lined
Color: Purple, Black
Estimated: 6
Usage: February __, 1897 to June 13, 1900
Examples without a duplex appear to be poorly inked and a true 254.018 without a duplex may not exist.
Black noted October, 1897 to January, 1898.
Davey/Bash listed type 235.01 and Burns added type 236.018 in 1972. In 1988, he replaced type 235.01 with type 253.01 and replaced type 236.018 with type 254.018. I believe type 254.018 includes all of the strikes listed as 235.01, 253.01 or 236.018 from Kohala so I list only it.

Kohala 254_8a18 97 - Jul 15, purple

July 15, 1897, purple

Kohala 254_8a18 97 - Jul 15, purple retrorevel

July 15, 1897, purple
(retroreveal enhanced)

Kohala 254_018 97 - Oct 13

October 13, 1897, black

Kukuihaele, Hamakua District
"traveling lights" [Pukui]; "moving Kukui trees" [Davey]
1880-1900
Postmasters: Dr. Trousseau (1880-1884), W. Hookuanui (1884-1885), W. Horner (1885-1900). Trousseau ran the post office from the Pacific Mill Company. Hookuanui may have kept the post office at his residence. Horner was manager of the Kukuihaele Plantation and ran a general store on the “main road” where he kept the post office. In 1893, the post office was located “on the main road near the road to Waimea,” perhaps the location of Horner’s store.
Mail service was by the overland carrier between Kawaihae and Hilo via Hamakua, or by ships at the Kukuihaele landing.


Kukuihaele Landing, 1892

Kukuihaele Landing, 1892


Kukuihaele 1892 from Davey album

Kukuihaele Landing, 1892


Location of Kukuihaele

Location of Kukuihaele.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii

282.01
32mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Blue, Black
Rarity: 1R, 21 strikes are recorded.
Usage: February 16, 1883 to December 11, 1891
Town letters are 4mm tall
Blue is noted September 7, 1887 and October 2, 1883, black from February 3, 1888 to April 6, 1891
On January 6, 1888, the PM sent the "case of type for the office stamps" to Honolulu for replacement, but it was repaired and returned by February 3, 1888 when a stamp with that date was canceled with this postmark. In January, 1892, he sent the device to Honolulu and requested a replacement.
Of the 18 strikes of this mark in the current census, there is a usage gap from December 24, 1885 to May 13, 1888. The gap perhaps is filled with undated examples as it is clear the postmaster was having trouble with the type for the dates. In any event, the recorded examples include a high percentage with weak or illegible dates. The latest recorded date in the census is October 22, 1890 (I have not seen this example so I cannot confirm that the date is accurate).

Kukuihaele 282_01 83 - Feb 16

February 16, 1883, blue


Kukuihaele 282_01 83 - Feb 16 retroreveal

February 16, 1883
(retroreveal enhanced)


Kukuihaele 282_01 90 - Feb _

February __, 1890, purple


Kukuihaele 282_01 90 - Feb _retrorevel

February __, 1890, purple
(retroreveal enhanced)


Kukuihaele 282_01 90 - Oct 22 ex-Davey

October 22, 1890, black

282.011
32mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple
Rarity: 1RR
Usage: December __, 1891 (noted on cover with Honolulu duplex dated December 19, 1891) to May 4, 1893
Misspelled "Kukuihaeli"; town letters are 3mm tall and tightly spaced
This device was received January 12, 1892, and by September, 1892, the postmaster complained about the illegible date type. It is known used into 1893 with unclear dates. PMG Hill admitted in 1892 that “those rubber stamps…are next to worthless." And added that “We have an order ready for steel stamps for the principal country offices, including your own, to be executed immediately on passage of the appropriations bill.”
There are 13 strikes recorded in the current census.

Kukuihaele 282_011 92 - Oct 27 Furukawa

October 27, 1892
(Courtesy of Alan Furukawa)

281.02
30mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple
Estimated: 7
Usage: October __, 1892 to May 12, 1900

Kukuihaele 282_01 00 - Apr 13

April 13, 1900


Kukuihaele 282_01 00 - Apr 13 retroreveal

April 13, 1900
(retroreveal enhanced)

Laupahoehoe, North Hilo District
"smooth lava tongue"
1859-1871; 1880-1884; 1888-1900
Postmasters: A. Harris & Co. (1859-1871), W. Lydgate [sometimes written as Lidgate] (1879-1886), E. W. Barnard (1888-1900). The post office was located at the Abel Harris plantation in the early years. William Lydgate had the office at his plantation.

Three postal facilities include the name Laupahoehoe. Laupahoehoe itself was split into two parts, one part being at the “Beach,” a lava peninsula jutting out from the North Hilo coast at the foot of Laupahoehoe Valley and below sheer 300 foot cliffs; the other, called the “Hill,” sat atop the cliffs on a plain that ran back toward the mountains. Hilo Road, the north south track taken by the overland mail carriers between Hilo and Kawaihae, ran along the plain and snaked down into the valley and back up to the plain. Laupahoehoe Village began at the mouth of Laupahoehoe valley and spread onto the peninsula. After sugar was planted on the plain above Laupahoehoe in 1880, a population came to live near the plantation office on the Hill. Mail service for the area was by the overland carrier going between Kawaihae and Hilo on the Hilo Road and by steamships landing mail in good weather at Laupahoehoe Landing.

Laupahoehoe post office originally was located on the peninsula at a trading station established there by Abel Harris. In an 1871 financial dust-up, Harris lost his land and left Laupahoehoe. The post office went dormant.

In 1880, Laupahoehoe Sugar Plantation formed. Its mill was built on the peninsula and its office was located on the “Hill.” The Laupahoehoe post office re-opened at the Laupahoehoe Plantation office on the “Hill” with postmaster Lydgate, who also was manager of Laupahoehoe Plantation. Lydgate remained postmaster of the “Hill” post office in the plantation headquarters and manager of the plantation until 1888. The name of this postal facility may have been called Laupahoehoe Plantation to distinguish it from a new post office opened at the Beach in 1884, but in correspondence it was called “the Hill.” It was the revived Laupahoehoe post office. The Laupahoehoe postmarking device type 282.016 was used at the plantation office until 1888. Laupahoehoe Beach post office was located at postmaster Barnard’s store on the peninsula near the mouth of the valley.

The Beach and Hill post offices were consolidated into one in 1888, with Barnard as postmaster and located at his store. The Beach facility took the name Laupahoehoe. At least from 1888 onward, Laupahoehoe post office was at Barnard’s store on the peninsula. The closing of the office on the Hill and the removal of the Laupahoehoe Plantation office to Papaaloa in 1889 prompted most of the Hill population to move to Papaaloa and the opening of a post office at Papaaloa.

Letter volume from this office was about 6,000 letters in 1887 and increased to about 9,000 letters in 1892, but dropped to 4,500 letters in 1894. Stamp sales in 1899 were about $500.


Laupahoehoe from above, undated post card

Laupahoehoe peninsula, undated post card


Laupahoehoe Village from 1908 post card

Laupahoehoe Village, a part of the “Beach” community on the peninsula, from a post card dated 1908


Laupahoehoe Hill Village

Laupahoehoe Village, a part of the “Beach” community at the mouth of the valley on Hilo Road
(Courtesy of Hawaiian Historical Society)

860
a crude oval with an outer border line used at the post office operated by Harris
LAUP/
HILO

Red
Rarity: 1RRRR three strikes recorded, all off-cover on 1859 Numerals from Plate 1-A.
Usage: 1859

Laupahoehoe 860, Golden lot 344

Plate 1-A-IV
(Courtesy of Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries)


Laupahoehoe 860, Golden lot 345

Plate 1-A-V
(Courtesy of Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries)


Laupahoehoe 860 on Plate 1-A-III , ex-Golden

ex-Ishikawa and ex-Golden, Plate 1-A-III; this stamp was shown on cover in the Ishikawa Sale, but the stamp did not originate on the cover. The stamp and the cover to which it was attached have been preserved as separate pieces.

803
manuscript
Laupahoehoe/date
Rarity: 1RRRR
Usage: circa 1864
Noted on Boston Lithograph stamps and on Scott No. 31

Laupahoehoe 803 ms on 27 – Gary

April 25, 1864
(Courtesy of Gary Peters)


Laupahoehoe 803 64 - Apr 25 retroreveal

April 25, 1864
(retroreveal enhanced)


Laupahoehoe 803 Twigg

(Courtesy of Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries)

804
manuscript
PO/Laupahoehoe/date
Rarity: 1RRRR
Usage: circa 1865
Noted on Boston Lithograph stamps and on Scott No. 31

PO Laupahoehoe Manuscript Cancel

May 22, 1865
(Courtesy of Eric A. Glohr)

805
manuscript
Laup
ahoehoe
Hilo

Rarity: 1RRRR
Noted on 1862 Numeral, Plate 3-G-V; this mark was used in the first post office iteration at Abel Harris’s trading station on the peninsula.

Laupahoehoe 805 on 16 Alan

(Courtesy of Alan Furukawa)

282.016
33mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Blue, Black
Rarity 1R, twenty-one strikes are recorded
Usage: April 20, 1883 to November 20, 1890
The reported EDU is nearly two years earlier than the next recorded date, February 19, 1885. Strikes of this mark were made while the post office was at the Laupahoehoe Plantation office on the “Hill” until 1888. Another usage gap exists from December 24, 1885 to May 13, 1888. Type 282.016 was again used after Laupahoehoe Beach was re-named Laupahoehoe. In 1890-1892, Barnard was using Laupahoehoe type 282.016 as his letterhead on correspondence with the Postmaster General. In March, 1891, Barnard asked for a replacement as the “rubber part” was “all played out.” The usage period includes only marks recorded on stamps. I have a blue strike on October 13, 1890. Black is noted in June, 1888.

Laupahoehoe 282_016 88 - May 13

May 13, 1888, purple

Laupahoehoe 282_016 88 - May 13 retroreveal

May 13, 1888
(retroreveal enhanced)

Laupahoehoe 282_016 90 - Oct 13

October 13, 1890, blue

282.011
33mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Blue, Black
Estimated: 7
Usage: September __, 1891 to June 28, 1899
I note blue strikes from September, 1892 to July, 1894 with a deep gray-blue or black color in 1893, and purple after July, 1894.

Laupahoehoe 282_011 92 - Sep 26

September, 26, 1892

Laupahoehoe 282_011 94 - Nov 5

November 5, 1894, deep gray-blue

Laupahoehoe 282_011 99 - Apr 18

April 18, 1899

Laupahoehoe 282_011 99 - Apr 18 retroreveal

April 18, 1899
(retroReveal enhanced)

281.01
30mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Blue (tentative)
Estimated: 7
Usage: February __, 1896 to November 2, 1899
Blue is not confirmed for this type; it was reported on an April 9, 1896 strike that, on examination, is a weak purple strike.
The year date often is illegible, particularly in the early years. The purple ink comes in a variety of shades from reddish to blackish.

Laupahoehoe 281_01 96 - Oct 26

October 26, 1896

Laupahoehoe 281_01 96 - Oct 26 retroreveal

October 26, 1896
(retroreveal enhanced)

291.01
41mm double lined outer circle and single lined inner circle, with serrated outer circle
Color: Purple, Black
Scarcity: 2
Usage: July 21, 1899 to December 27, 1899
I have a weak purplish-black strike on December 27, 1899.

Laupahoehoe 291_01 99 - Sep 1 purple

September 1, 1899, purple

Laupahoehoe 291_01 99 - Dec 27 cover - OFF detail

December 27, 1899, purplish-black

Laupahoehoe 291_01 99 - Dec 27 cover - OFF detail retroreveal

December 27, 1899
(retroreveal enhanced)

255.01
29mm double lined circle
Color: Purple
Rarity 1R, thirteen strikes are recorded
Usage: November 20, 1899 to June __, 1900

Laupahoehoe 255_01 99 Nov 20

November 20, 1899

Laupahoehoe Beach, North Hilo District
1884-1888
Postmasters: Judge D. K. Pa (1884), O. Masche (1885-1886) and E. W. Barnard (1886-1888)
This office was at Barnard’s store on the peninsula at the mouth of Laupahoehoe Valley, and was renamed Laupahoehoe in 1888, providing mail service for the peninsula. The population of the Hill community moved to Papaaloa in 1889 when the plantation headquarters moved from Laupahoehoe.
Letter volume was reported under the name of Laupahoehoe.

282.04
33mm double lined circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Black, Red
Scarcity: 2
Usage: May 7, 1885 to December __, 1888
Black is noted on May 7, 1885.
I note black strikes in February, 1887, April, 1887 and March, 1888 and a red strike on Scott 43 in September but the year date is not visible on this partial strike.

Laupahoehoe Beach 282_04 86 - Aug 24

August 24, 1886

Laupahoehoe Beach 282_04 86 - Aug 24 retroreveal

August 24, 1886
(retroreveal enhanced)

Laupahoehoe Beach 282_04 87 - Apr 12 Kay

April 12, 1887
(Courtesy of Phil Kay)

Laupahoehoe Beach 282_04 __ - Sep 22 reddish

September 22, __, reddish

Laupahoehoe Plantation, North Hilo District
1884-1887
Postmasters: J. M. Lydgate (1884-1886) and E. W. Barnard (1886-1887)
The name Laupahoehoe Plantation refers to the postal operation conducted at the plantation office on the Hill but probably never was used as the name for a post office. The postal facility located at the plantation office on the Hill was the revived Laupahoehoe office. Laupahoehoe postmark type 282.016 was transferred to this facility. The office at the plantation was closed in 1888 and consolidated with Laupahoehoe Beach. Plantation headquarters were moved to Papaaloa in 1889. In an 1889 letter seeking to have a post office at Papaaloa, C McLennan noted that the office was in the plantation office “when in Laupahoehoe but it was discontinued because of its closeness to the one at Laupahoehoe.” With the move of the plantation headquarters in 1889, almost all of the Hill population moved to Papaaloa.
No postmark known, but Laupahoehoe type 282.016 was used at Laupahoehoe Plantation at least in in 1885 and perhaps to 1888.

Mahukona, North Kohala District
"leeward stream"
1881-1900
Postmasters: W. C. Thurman (1881-1882), Joseph P. Sisson (1882-1883), C. E. Stackpole of Wilder & Co. (1884), J. F. MacKenzie (1884-1885), T. H. Wright (1885-1886), Charles K. Stillman (1886-1887) and J. S. Smithies (1887-1900). When the Hawaiian Railroad was built to service the sugar plantations of North Kohala, Mahukona was chosen as the terminus and landing. The place was uninhabited before the Hawaiian Railroad chose Mahukona as its terminal. For the few people who came to work at Mahukona, water had to be brought by train because of the arid climate.

Mahukona postmarks are considerably more numerous than would be suggested for a small population, owing to the fact that Kohala postmaster Smithies opened letter bags going to or from Kohala and marked them, a fact that caused tension with the Kohala folks who suspected Smithies of losing or misdirecting mail for folks he didn’t like. Smithies postmarked letters to or from the more populated places in North Kohala. In 1887, the office sent nearly 11,000 letters with an increase to about 14,000 in 1888 and about 16,000 in 1894, mostly letters from other places. Actual stamp sales at the Mahukona office averaged only about $15 annually. Thus, covers originating at Mahukona are relatively scarce compared to those transiting Mahukona. The Mahukona post office was tied closely to the custom house and S.G. Wilder & Co. office, the postmasters working for one or the other. Wilder & Co, owned and ran the railroad and terminal. A combination custom house/post office was built in 1884. In mid-1894, a fire destroyed the offices, including the post office, but service was restored quickly and the office was rebuilt.


Mahukona Landing, c. 1895

Mahukona Landing, c. 1895
(Courtesy of Hawaii State Archives)


Location of Mahukona

Location of Kohala.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii


Mahukona 281_01 96 - Aug 3

A cover sent from Hilo (postmarked August 1, 1896, type 253.03) addressed to Kohala (postmarked August 3, 1896 on the reverse side, type 282.013(II), with a Mahukona transit postmark dated August 3, 1896, type 281.01.


Mahukona 255_01 00 - Mar 20 fumigated cover

An uncommon cover originating at Mahukona. Postmarked March 20, 1900 with Mahukona type 255.01, sent to Honolulu and postmarked March 25, 1900, type 232.92, and fumigated at Honolulu before dispatching to San Francisco.

813
manuscript
Mahukona, H. I./date
Rarity: 1RRRR
One strike noted on Scott No. 35 cover

Mahukona 804 __ - Jul 2 ms detail – Peters

July 2, __
(Courtesy of Gary Peters)

Mahukona 804 __ - Jul 2 ms detail - Peters retroreveal

detail enhanced by retroreveal

282.016
33mm double lined circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Red, Black
Estimated: 6
Usage: October 18, 1882 to May 20, 1896
Ink changes happened numerous times during the life of this device with red and black inks taking turns until purple was introduced in December, 1887, after which purple dominated except for stretch of red ink from April, 1895 to July, 1895. The dates are illegible in the middle years. On July 8, 1889 and again on January 28, 1891, postmaster Smithies complained about the failure of the dates to print.

Mahukona 282_016 86 - Oct 15 red

October 15, 1886, red

Mahukona 282_016 87 - Oct 5

October 5, 1887, black

Mahukona 282_016 95 - Oct 29

October 29, 1895, purple

282.011
33mm double lined circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Black
Scarcity: 4
Usage: September 20, 1889 to February 23, 1894
The reported black ink strikes may all be dark purplish-black strikes. I have not seen a true black strike.

Mahukona 282_011 93 - Jun 10

June 10, 1893

281.01
30mm double lined circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Red, Blue, Black
Estimated: 7
Usage: August 21, 1894 to November __, 1899
Red noted from March 13, 1897 to December, 1897; dark blue noted October, 1894. I have not confirmed a true black strike. Smithies was having trouble again in 1896. He wrote to PMG Oat saying that the screw works loose from the office stamp “and the type slips back” so no date printed. Oat told him a new stamp had been ordered “from the coast,”

Mahukona 281_01 94 - Oct 27

October 27, 1894, deep bluish-black

Mahukona 281_01 96 - Aug 3

August 3, 1896, purple

Mahukona 281_01 96 - Aug 3 retroreveal

August 3, 1896
(retroreveal enhanced)

Mahukona 281_01 97 - Jul 3

July 3, 1897, red

Mahukona 281_01 97 - Jul 3 retroreveal

July 3, 1897
(retroreveal enhanced)

253.01
27mm double lined circle
Color: Purple, Red
Estimated: 5
Usage: November 8, 1897 to May 11, 1900
Red is noted in November, 1897.
Late strikes have single lined outer circles.

Mahukona 253_01 98 - Sep 8 – Peters

September 8, 1898
(Courtesy of Gary Peters)

Mahukona 253_01 98 - Dec 23

December 23, 1898
double outer line is visible

Mahukona 253_01 98 - Dec 23 retroreveal

December 23, 1898
(retroreveal enhanced)

255.01
29mm double lined circle
Color: Purple, Blue
Scarcity: 2
Usage: November 21, 1899 to June 13, 1900

Mahukona 255_01 00 - Mar 20

March 20, 1900, purple

Mahukona 255_01 00 - June 13 1900 LKU detail V-P copy

June 13, 1900, blue
(Courtesy of David Volstrup-Petersen)

Maunaoni, South Kona District
Informal letter box located along the Kawaihae to Ka'u overland route about 3 miles south of Hookena.


Maunaoni Location

Location of Maunaoni.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii

805
manuscript
Maunaoni
Rarity: 1RRRR

Maunaoni 805 Wild

(Courtesy of Norbert Wild)

Mountain View, Puna District
1864-1870; 1897-1900
Postmaster: J. W. Mason (1897-1900). In early 1894, A. E. Sutton handled mail at Mountain View and J. W. Mason handled mail there beginning in mid-1894.
Mountain View was a community center for coffee planters in the Olaa region. C.E. Richardson had a store there. In the mid to late 1890s, Mountain View and Olaa, near present day Kurtistown, were part of a Volcano Road “postal service” managed by J.R. Wilson, owner of Volcano Stables in Hilo. Wilson began operating a carriage service from Hilo to Volcano House in 1893, even before the carriage road was completed in 1894. Formally, Wilson was the Olaa postmaster and contractor for mail carriage south of Hilo, including Puna and Ka‘u. Wilson kept Postmaster General Oat and Hilo postmaster Severance apprised of how he managed mail distribution at the places where he left mail. He also picked up mail left at distribution sites and carried it back to Hilo or Olaa to be postmarked. Rather than formal appointments for local postmasters, Wilson’s commission as Olaa postmaster was seen as covering the route and he was left to use his best judgment. Correspondence describing Wilson’s arrangements along Volcano Road sometimes fuse Olaa and Mountain View.

It seems that when Wilson began his carriage service to Volcano House, he left mail in boxes for local coffee planters living along the route and also left mail at Richardson’s store in Mountain View. Wilson then opened a hotel at Mountain View in late 1893. Visitors using his carriages to reach the volcano could stop for refreshments at Wilson’s half-way house at Olaa or at his new hotel at Mountain View. He made his hotel manager at Mountain View, A.E. Sutton, his Mountain View postmaster. Wilson suggested giving Sutton a commission as postmaster, but Oat decided to leave Wilson as postmaster (thus Wilson’s Olaa commission was seen as covering the route). In 1894, Hilo postmaster Severance hired Sutton to become Severance’s postal clerk so Sutton left Mountain View. John Mason, a local coffee planter who lived about ¼ of a mile from the hotel, took over the mail left at Mountain View. In 1897, Wilson sold out and left. Mason was appointed in Wilson’s place for Olaa and also was appointed postmaster at Mountain View.


Mountain View Location

Location of Mountain View.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii


Olaa stage parcel ticket

Package ticket for the Volcano Stage.

803
manuscript
Mt. View/date
Rarity: 1RRRR
Usage: June 28, 1894
Noted on Scott No. 75
Two strikes recorded

Mt. View 94 - Jun 28

Hilo postmark dated June 28, 1894

Naalehu, Ka'u District
"volcano ash"
1886-1900
Postmasters: H. Center (1888-1891), C. Binning (1891-1893), G. S. Patten (1893-1895) and G. C. Hewitt (1895-1900). This office was located at the Hutchison Plantation headquarters and the postmasters were associated with the plantation operations. Center was the manager and his deputy was Binning. Hewitt took over management when Center moved to Spreckelsville, Maui to run the Hawaiian Commercial and Agricultural Co. and become postmaster at Spreckelsville. Mail volume was about 2,000 letters in 1887, about 3,000 letters annually from 1888 to 1892 and about 4,500 letters in 1894. Stamp sales in 1899 were about $500, seventh highest on the island. Mail service was by the overland mail carrier from Hilo to Kawaihae via Kona and by steamships landing mail at Honuapo or Punaluu.


Naalehu village

Naalehu Village, circa 1900
(Courtesy of Hawaii State Archives)


Naalehu Location

Location of Naalehu.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii


Naalehu 282_011 96 - Jan 13 entire

Postmarked at Naalehu on January 13, 1896 with type 282.011. The cover bears the corner card for Hutchison Sugar Plantation Co., headquartered at Naalehu.

282.011
33mm double lined circle and single lined inner circle; the shape is more oval than round although some strikes may appear more round than oval
Color: Purple, Blue
Estimated: 5
Usage: January 10, 1891 to August __, 1897

Naalehu 282_011 91 - Jan 10 purple

January 10, 1891

Naalehu 282_011 96 - Jan 13 detail

January 13, 1896
oval shape

253.9a1
27mm double lined circle; with a duplex target cancel
Color: Purple
Estimated: 5
Usage: November 24, 1897 to March __, 1900

Naalehu 253_9a1 98 Nov 7

November 7, 1898

255.01
29mm double lined circle
Color: Purple
Rarity: 1RRRR, three strikes recorded
Usage: May 4, 1900 to June __, 1900

Naalehu 255_01 00 - May 4

May 4, 1900

Naalehu 255_01 00 - May 4 retroreveal

May 4, 1900
(retroreveal enhanced)

Naalehu 255_01 00 - Jun _

June _, 1900

Naalehu 255_01 00 - Jun _ retroreveal

June _, 1900
(retroreveal enhanced)

Naalehu 255_01 00 - Jun _ Furukawa

June _, 1900
(Courtesy of Alan Furukawa)

Napoopoo, South Kona District
"deep holes"
1882-1900
Postmasters: S. W. Kino (1884-1894), S. Kekumano (1894-1895), William Kamauhoa (1895-1896), R. Wassman (1896-1900). A landing on the south side of Kealakekua Bay (seen in the foreground of the photograph below) and site of the old mission church, Kahikolu. The original post office located at Napoopoo Landing was called Kealakekua (see listing for Kealakekua) and was run out of Capt. Cummings’s store at the landing. In 1870 the Kealakekua post office moved to the uphill coastal plain and took the post office equipment with it, leaving Napoopoo Landing without any post office until 1883. Steamships landed mail across the Bay at Kaawaloa landing (in the photograph below, Kaawaloa is on the far side of the Bay), Greenwell had them carried uphill to his office and arranged to distribute mail for Napoopoo from there. An office “near the landing” at Napoopoo was run as a “postal agency” starting in 1884. In 1896, the Napoopoo postmaster was removed and Wassman, the Kealakekua postmaster, ran both offices.


Kealakekua Bay c. 1926

aerial view of Kealakekua Bay, c. 1926
(Courtesy of Hawaii State Archives)


Napoopoo Location

Location of Napoopoo.
For overland route and map details see Overland Mail Routes - Island of Hawaii Routes
and Maps of Hawaii - Island of Hawaii

802
manuscript
Napoopoo/P. O.
Rarity: 1RRRR
Noted on Scott No. 31

Napoopoo 802 P.O. manuscript

(Courtesy of Alan Furukawa)

Napoopoo 802 P.O. manuscript retroreveal

(retroreveal enhanced)

809
manuscript
Napoopoo/S.K.
Rarity: 1RRRR
Noted on Scott No. 38

Napoopoo 805 Furukawa

(Courtesy of Alan Furukawa)

282.01
33mm double lined circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple
Rarity: 1RR, fourteen strikes are recorded
Usage: September __, 1883 to September __, 1896

Napoopoo 282_01 86 - Apr 29

April 29, 1886

282.011
33mm double lined circle and single lined inner circle
Color: Purple, Black
Scarcity: 4
Usage: September 18, 1894 to October 7, 1896
Early strikes are in black to December, 1894.
In August, 1896, Wassman complained that “The old stamp is about worn out. The screw is worn so that the Type falls out.” He asked for a new office stamp.

Napoopoo 282_011 96 - Oct 7

October 7, 1896

Napoopoo 282_011 96 - Oct 7 retroreveal

October 7, 1896
(retroreveal enhanced)

Napoopoo 282_011 __ - Dec _, black

Dec __, black

253.01
27mm double lined circle; later strikes have a single lined circle
Color: Purple
Estimated: 6
Usage: August 31, 1896 to May 28, 1900

Napoopoo 253_01 96 - Oct 7

October 7, 1896
Double lined strike

Napoopoo 253_01 96 - Oct 7 retroreveal

October 7, 1896
(retroreveal enhanced)

Napoopoo 253_01 97 - Aug 2

Date failed but other marks show it to be August 2, 1897

Niulii, North Kona District
"small coconut"
1884-1886
No postmark known.

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